Consequences of leaving the U.S. without advance parole

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Leaving the United States without obtaining advance parole can have serious consequences for certain non-U.S. citizens, including IR-6 visa holders who have filed for adjustment of status to become lawful permanent residents. Advance parole is a document issued by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that allows certain non-U.S. citizens to re-enter the United States after traveling abroad. In this article, we will discuss the consequences of leaving the United States without obtaining advance parole for IR-6 visa holders.

Abandonment of Adjustment of Status Application
IR-6 visa holders who have filed for adjustment of status to become lawful permanent residents and leave the United States without obtaining advance parole risk the abandonment of their adjustment of status application. Abandonment occurs when an applicant leaves the United States before their application for adjustment of status is approved, denied, or terminated, and the USCIS determines that the applicant has abandoned their application.

If an IR-6 visa holder abandons their adjustment of status application, they may be unable to re-enter the United States as a lawful permanent resident. Instead, they may need to reapply for a new immigrant visa and restart the entire immigration process, which can be time-consuming and costly.

Inadmissibility to the United States
IR-6 visa holders who leave the United States without obtaining advance parole may also be subject to inadmissibility to the United States upon their return. Inadmissibility is a legal determination made by the U.S. government that prevents certain non-U.S. citizens from entering the United States.

An IR-6 visa holder may be deemed inadmissible if they leave the United States without advance parole and attempt to re-enter without a valid immigrant visa or other appropriate travel document. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer may deny the IR-6 visa holder’s entry into the United States and direct them to apply for a new immigrant visa.

Deportation from the United States
IR-6 visa holders who leave the United States without advance parole may also be subject to deportation from the United States. Deportation is a legal process by which non-U.S. citizens are removed from the United States and returned to their country of origin.

If an IR-6 visa holder is deemed inadmissible to the United States upon their return and is unable to obtain a new immigrant visa, they may be subject to deportation. Deportation can have serious consequences for the individual, including being barred from re-entering the United States in the future.

Loss of Work Authorization
IR-6 visa holders who leave the United States without obtaining advance parole may also lose their work authorization. Work authorization is a legal permission granted by the U.S. government that allows non-U.S. citizens to work in the United States.

If an IR-6 visa holder abandons their adjustment of status application by leaving the United States without advance parole, they may also lose their work authorization. This can result in the loss of their job and the inability to work legally in the United States in the future.

Conclusion
IR-6 visa holders who have filed for adjustment of status to become lawful permanent residents should avoid leaving the United States without obtaining advance parole. Doing so can result in the abandonment of their adjustment of status application, inadmissibility to the United States, deportation, and loss of work authorization. IR-6 visa holders should plan their travel accordingly, apply for advance parole as early as possible, and present their advance parole document to the CBP officer upon re-entry to the United States. By following these steps, IR-6 visa holders can travel outside of the United States as needed and avoid jeopardizing their immigration status.

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